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FAQ

antiFOG QUESTIONS

If your understanding of this technology is little foggy, please see these FAQs.

How do antiFOG lenses work?

The back of the lens has a military-grade, hydrophilic layer (meaning it holds water). When the layer is exposed to water vapour/humidity, it absorbs and disperses it throughout the material, eliminating the opportunity to condense on the surface as fog. RYDERS antiFOG will absorb more than any other fog-resistant treatment on the market and it's also far more durable. That said, it works much like a sponge, meaning that in extreme situations it can reach its maximum saturation and begin to fog. This is why it's important to use best practices—buy glasses that are the right size on your face to allow plenty of airflow, let the lenses air out when possible and keep them clean so the layer remains absorbent.

Are antiFOG lenses fog proof?

The easy answer is no—they're fog-resistant. Very fog-resistant. The military-grade antiFOG layer is permanently bonded to the back of the lens to give you the best fog-resistance and durability on the market today. For some people, they will never fog. For others, they are a great tool for getting further without having to let the lenses breathe. There are many factors at play: environment, fit/airflow, humidity, temperature, sweatiness, etc. Some people are simply more sweaty than others, some environments are more humid than others, some trails are slower and more demanding than others. Please read through the other questions for a better understanding of how they work and how to keep them performing at their best.

Why is the antiFOG only on the back of the lens?

The front of the lens needs to overcome an entirely different set of challenges than the back of the lens so it only makes sense that the front is treated independently. The hydrophobic layer on the front of the lens sheds water much more easily than the antiFOG layer, leaving a clear view, free from large droplets and water marks.

I've used fog-resistant lenses in the past and the coating eventually washed away. Will this happen with antiFOG?

No. This is a military-grade coating that will not wear out under normal conditions and does not need to be reapplied. If you ever find that the lenses aren't working as well as they used to, just give them a wash and let them dry. It's most likely that the antiFOG layer is clogged up with dirt and grease, preventing it from absorbing moisture. We highly recommend that you thoroughly clean the lens and let it dry after every use.

Will antiFOG lenses work in the rain?

This depends on a number of factors: fit/airflow, temperature, sweatiness, etc. These lenses need to be able to absorb moisture to work. If they are at their maximum saturation, they can no longer absorb moisture—this is when they can start to fog. If water is landing directly on the back of the lenses, they will hit their maximum saturation much more quickly than if they're only being exposed to vapour. When it's raining, it's very humid (obviously) so the lenses can have trouble ‘airing out’ or releasing some of their absorbed moisture into the air. Less-sweaty people with lots of airflow might find flawless performance from the lenses while others might find rainy conditions to push these lenses beyond their optimal performance.

veloPOLAR™ antiFOG

What is veloPOLAR™?

There are three concerns that turn road cyclists away from Polarized lenses and they're all valid to varying degrees: polarized lenses can hide slippery surfaces; they can black out LCD screens on cycling computers; and they can produce undesirable optical anomalies that alter depth perception on features like sewer covers, windshields and road patches. Some road cyclists aren’t bothered by these things or rarely notice them, but others find these to be big problems. It's for this reason that we've developed our veloPOLAR™ antiFOG lens. This lens is fine-tuned to give road cyclists the benefits of a Polarized lens without the compromises, allowing it to filter out the blinding part of the glare without hiding a slippery surface or blacking out an LCD screen. It even minimizes optical anomalies and utilizes our antiFOG and hydrophobic coatings.

Photochromic lenses

When the sunlight changes, the tint changes. It seems pretty simple but there are some really good questions below that will help you to understand this technology better.

How do Photochromic lenses work?

Each Photochromic lens contains millions of organic molecules that react to UV light. When exposed to UV light, the molecules change shape, absorbing light particles and making the lens darker. When there is less UV light, the opposite reaction takes place and the lens tint becomes lighter.

Is the UV protection affected by the darkness of the lens?

All Ryders lenses protect from 100% of UVA, UVB and UVC rays as well as harmful, high-energy visible light to 400nm, no matter what the tint. Our clear lenses have the same UV protection as our darkest Polarized or Photochromic lenses. So, the UV protection is not affected by the darkness of the lens.

Some brands advertise that their lenses change instantly. Is this true?

It's a trick. All Photochromic lenses—no matter what the brand—BEGIN to change instantly, so yes they technically change instantly but the full transition takes a lot longer. No brand can truthfully give an exact length of time for a full transition to take place because there are many factors at play: amount of UV, lens temperature, direct or indirect light, etc. Also, the final 5% of the transition will take a whole lot longer than the first 5% so the transition time to maximum darkness isn't all that important. It's important to know that all brands of Photochromics, no matter what fancy, trademarked name is attached to them, will transition from a light tint to a dark tint a lot faster than they will from dark to light. Changes will happen faster and the range will be greater in colder temperatures.

Are Photochromic lenses better than Interchangeable lenses?

It depends on what you want from your glasses. Interchangeables are good if you want to choose a different colour of lens before you head out. Most people won't bother to carry their spare lenses and change them on the fly. Photochromics are good if you want a pair of glasses that is constantly adapting to the light conditions (time of day, weather, orientation in relation to the sun, etc.) but don't require the lens to change colours.

How long do Photochromic lenses last?

All Photochromic lenses—no matter what brand name they carry—will eventually wear out. The lifespan of the lenses varies depending on the frequency and conditions of use. Generally speaking, the lenses will perform best for the first two years of use. Beyond that, the transitional activity will diminish. Despite the eventual expiration of the Photochromic properties of the lens, they will always provide 100% UVA, UVB, and UVC protection.

Are Photochromic lenses good for driving?

Not usually if you want them to transition. Most car windshields block UV light which is needed for the Photochromic chemical reaction to take place. For this reason, you should not expect the lenses to darken.

Polarized lenses

You've heard of them. You think you've owned some. You know that they're better—at least you think you do—but you don't know how they work or if there is something more suited to your activities. You've come to the right place.

What do Polarized lenses do and how do they work?

Polarized lenses block reflected glare. By doing this they allow you to see through reflections, they sharpen details in surface textures and they cut back on ambient haze. They work by blocking the polarized light that is reflected off of horizontal surfaces such as roads, water, ice, etc. When light hits a flat surface, it's condensed into a light beam with waves that are oriented in the same direction. To make it easier to understand you can imagine these horizontally polarized waves as a horizontal bar and imagine the Polarized filter as vertical bars like those on a prison cell. The cell bars will prevent the horizontal bar from passing through, while allowing a vertical bar in. So, the condensed reflections are blocked but light waves that are more vertically oriented are allowed through.

Do Polarized lenses provide more UV protection?

No, but ours do. All Ryders lenses protect from 100% of UVA, UVB and UVC rays as well as harmful, high-energy visible light to 400nm, no matter what the tint. Our clear lenses have the same UV protection as our darkest Polarized lenses. But, that’s just the light that reaches your eye through the front of the lens. In bright, glaring conditions (like those where you would reach for your Polarized glasses) there is a lot of light bouncing around. Some of that light is going to bounce off of the back of the lens and into your eye, which is now wide open because you're wearing dark, Polarized lenses. For this reason, we apply a Premium Anti-Reflective Coating (AR Coating) to the back of all of our Polarized lenses. It absorbs the UV instead of reflecting it into your eye. In addition to providing important UV protection, it also enhances clarity. So, the answer is no, Polarized lenses do not provide more UV protection but Ryders Polarized lenses do because of our AR Coating.

I see that Ryders Polarized lenses have an Anti-reflective coating on the back. What is that for?

Bank security guards. Floating seat cushions. Denim on motorcycles. Sometimes we think we’re protected even when we’re not. The reality of sunglasses is that some unfiltered light, including UV, will reach your eye (which is now wide open because you're wearing dark, Polarized lenses) by reflecting off the back of the lens. For this reason, we apply a Premium Anti-Reflective Coating (AR Coating) to the back of all of our Polarized lenses. It absorbs the UV instead of reflecting it into your eye. In addition to providing important UV protection, it also enhances clarity.

I hear that Polarized lenses aren’t ideal for road cycling. Is this true?

It’s subjective. There are three concerns that turn road cyclists away from Polarized lenses and they're all valid to varying degrees: polarized lenses can hide slippery surfaces; they can black out LCD screens on cycling computers; and they can produce undesirable optical anomalies that alter depth perception on features like sewer covers, windshields and road patches. Some road cyclists aren’t bothered by these things or rarely notice them, but others find these to be big problems. It's for this reason that we've developed our veloPOLAR™ antiFOG lens. This lens is fine-tuned to give road cyclists the benefits of a Polarized lens without the compromises, allowing it to filter out the blinding part of the glare without hiding a slippery surface or blacking out an LCD screen. It even minimizes optical anomalies and utilizes our antiFOG and hydrophobic coatings.

I can buy Polarized glasses for $30 or $500—what's the difference?

Not all Polarized lenses are created equal. Not even close. The cheapest polarized lenses are called TAC lenses and they’re made from a bent sheet of thin material. They offer plenty of distortion and headaches to match. The next step up are sandwiched polarized lenses. These are often optically correct, but sometimes aren’t. Another downside of these lenses is that they involve the use of an adhesive that can decrease their clarity. The best Polarized sport lenses are injected but it should be noted that different manufacturers’ processes can produce different qualities of lens. It should also be noted that some brands will claim that their lenses are injected because the two individual pieces of their sandwiched lens are injected, but this isn’t a true Injected Polarized lens. Actual Injected Polycarbonate Polarized lenses are made by injecting the liquid Polycarbonate around the Polarizing filter. The process is more expensive than sandwiching the filter between two pre-moulded pieces but produces a much better result with no clarity-robbing adhesives. All Ryders Polarized lenses are made using this premium process.

Ryders Standard lenses

These are our base lenses—the technology off of which we build our most advanced lenses. But there's nothing basic about them. Here are some common questions:

Do all of your lenses provide 100% UV protection?

Yes. All Ryders lenses protect from 100% of UVA, UVB and UVC rays as well as harmful, high-energy visible light to 400nm, no matter what the tint. Our clear lenses have the same UV protection as our darkest lenses.

Which lens tint provides the most UV protection?

All of them. All Ryders lenses protect from 100% of UVA, UVB and UVC rays as well as harmful, high-energy visible light to 400nm, no matter what the tint. Our clear lenses have the same UV protection as our darkest lenses.

What does Optically Correct and Decentered mean?

These are the same thing and they are critically important to the quality of the lenses. An Optically Correct/Decentered lens is specifically formed to drastically reduce distortion and eye fatigue. These lenses have an optical centre that is offset from the mechanical or geometrical centre so as to properly align with the eye. Visual distortion occurs when light waves hit a curved or angled lens, causing it to refract (bend), distorting an object’s true size or position. Our optically correct/decentered lenses are progressively tapered from the optical centre toward the outer edges to prevent this distortion.

How durable are Ryders lenses?

Short of freezing them to unrealistic temperatures before a massive impact, Ryders lenses—for all reasonable intents and purposes—will not shatter into little pieces. All of our lenses are moulded from Polycarbonate—a material that’s used in riot shields, astronaut visors and bulletproof glass. One reason it’s so good for impact-resistance is because of its flexibility, but flexible things are softer than more rigid things. Softer things scratch more easily. It's for this reason that we apply a super durable, scratch-resistant coating to our lenses. The lenses remain flexible and impact resistant but their surfaces will resist scratching. It's still important that you take proper care of them and avoid wiping them if they’re gritty.

I see you have a Hydrophobic Coating on all of your lenses. What is this?

Hydrophobic Coating is an altogether misleading name. This coating isn’t nearly as scared of water as water is of the coating. In fact, water runs away at first contact leaving clear lines of sight that are free from large drops and water marks. It’s a smooth, hard coating that makes it really easy for water to roll off rather than just bead up and stick to it. This coating also makes the lenses very easy to clean because there isn't much that can stick to it.

I see you have a scratch-resistant coating on all of your lenses. Does this mean they won't scratch?

They aren't scratch-proof. In fact, nothing solid is except diamonds. All of our lenses are moulded from Polycarbonate—a material that’s used in riot shields, astronaut visors and bulletproof glass. One reason it’s so good for impact-resistance is because of its flexibility, but flexible things are softer than more rigid things. Softer things scratch more easily. It's for this reason that we apply a super durable, scratch-resistant coating to our lenses. The lenses remain flexible and impact resistant but their surfaces will resist scratching. It's still important that you take proper care of them and avoid wiping them if they’re gritty.

Prescription/RX questions

Which Ryders sunglass frames will take prescription lenses.

All of our glasses with the exception of those with shield lenses (1-piece lens) or toric lenses (lenses that curve drastically in two directions such as the Hayden and Coco) will take prescription lenses up to +-3.75.

General questions

Will you sponsor me?

We don't know, maybe. We are asked this question constantly and it usually doesn't include any other information, which makes it really easy to say no. That said, if you think you're sponsorship material, we definitely want to hear from you. Send us your resumé/athletic accomplishments, your plans for the upcoming season and a description of how we can help. It would also be great to hear some ideas for how we can work together so everyone comes out ahead. Pictures, videos and social media links will help a lot. Please email Fraser at fvaage@ryderseyewear.com.

How do I become a Ryders dealer?

Becoming a dealer is very easy. Just fill out this brief form and we'll have a Ryders representative contact you shortly.

Where are my house keys?

Well, let's start by retracing your steps. When did you last have them? Are they still in the door lock? It often helps to start there.